Insulation

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Insulating your home can be one of the easiest ways to reduce your heating bills. Approximately 25% of your home’s heat can be lost through an uninsulated loft and approximately 35% through uninsulated cavity walls (twice this if the wall is solid) . For a typical property, it will only take a few years to repay the investment.

Loft Insulation

It is recommended that homes have 270 mm (10.5 inches) of loft insulation. This can be installed by a professional installer, or anyone with competent DIY skills.

Cavity Wall Insulation

Properties with a standard wall cavity (gap between the two layers of an external wall) can insulate this space using insulation blown into the wall through small drill holes. This can be carried out by professional installers. If the cavity is narrow (less than 50mm wide) or unsuitable for insulation then there may be additional support available to help pay for more complicated techniques or insulation types (see our Grants and Loans page). Buildings with cavity walls usually have bricks with a uniform pattern, with bricks the same width (left hand image).

Solid Wall Insulation

If your property has a solid wall then you can insulate it either externally or internally. There are a number of different types of solid wall insulation. For external wall insulation, boards are attached to the side of your property and can then be covered with a render or cladding. If your building is subject to strict planning restrictions, then you can insulate the inside of a room, although this will reduce the floor space. Buildings with solid walls usually have bricks with an alternating pattern or short and long bricks (right hand image).

Cavity wall example                          Solid wall example

Cavity wall example   Solid Wall example
For more information about the likely costs and repayment periods for insulation, see the Energy Saving Trust website.